thruxtonized

I’d intended to post something yesterday but somehow never had time. I was going to post photos, only somehow I never took any (ok, just one). Words will have to do. Saturday, I drove up to Concord (an hour and a half away from me) to pick up my Triumph Thruxton at Ace Motorsports (who […]

I’d intended to post something yesterday but somehow never had time. I was going to post photos, only somehow I never took any (ok, just one).

Words will have to do.

Saturday, I drove up to Concord (an hour and a half away from me) to pick up my Triumph Thruxton at Ace Motorsports (who have the best logo ever).

That the bike would be beautiful I already knew. I’d seen one just like it at a local dealer (though not for sale).

The folks at Ace (Bryan and Jim) were great, and every single person I talked to said that’s a beautiful bike.

My thruxton cane equipped with TOR (triumph factory ‘off road’) exhaust, which makes it rumble and growl. In effect, it makes it sound like a triumph, not like a sewing machine. The exhaust note couldn’t be prettier, and isn’t absurdly loud.

After doing paperwork and throwing down money, I rode off into the sunset, taking clayton road (a mildly hilly route with some nice twists and sweepers) to get used to the bike.

It’s an adjustment. My last two bikes were huge-displacement (1500cc and 1200cc), a cruiser and a sport tourer, respectively. The Thruxton is smaller (865cc), with a classic flat cafe-racer seating position. This bike is lighter, more nimble, more responsive. On the other hand, it lacks the enormous reserve of pure horsepower. It also lacks the full fairing of my old Trophy, so the sense of being one with the road – and exposed to the elements – is significant. Also my back and shoulders aren’t use to more aggressive riding position. I spend half the ride clenched up like I was hanging on for dear life; I had to will my muscles to relax. I was well aware the next day of the combination of tightness and using muscles that haven’t been in use a lot lately. Riding more, obviously, is the answer to both.

This is, I think, the most purely fun motorcycle I’ve ever ridden. It’s got it’s limitations (I wouldn’t take it on a 200 mile run, and it’s not at it’s best on long freeway blasts, not ’til I add a little bikini fairing, anyway). But as far as pure joy, it trumps anything I’ve ever been on. And given that I never do longs runs, the trade is far in my favor.

One of the things that I love about the triumph is that it invites customization. Pipes (done, though I went with the triumph upgrade, not the expensive and much louder options from predator or arrow or or staintune or others), upgraded suspension, performance mods, seats, fairings, light changes, chassis mods, etc. Given time and money,I’d add custom paint and gradually change out anything and everything. But I did replace the heel guard, just because I needed to do SOMETHING to make the bike visibly mine.

Here’s a street-fighter guard from motocyco.biz, who are incredibly cool people:

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Later, I’ll get better pix to post. Kenny’s offered to take some, which insures they’ll be better than anything I can take myself.

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