Rock ’em sock ’em ceos – why my boss can beat up their boss

BoingBoing posted this spot-on attack on what Fred Amoroso, Macrovision’s CEO, calls an open letter to Steve Jobs. Cory says: The CEO of Macrovision has sent an open letter to Steve Jobs telling him off for speaking out against DRM. Macrovision is a company that makes abusive DRMs (the system that stops you from hooking […]

BoingBoing posted this spot-on attack on what Fred Amoroso, Macrovision’s CEO, calls an open letter to Steve Jobs.

Cory says:

The CEO of Macrovision has sent an open letter to Steve Jobs telling him off for speaking out against DRM. Macrovision is a company that makes abusive DRMs (the system that stops you from hooking up your VCR and your DVD player in series, the system that stops your TiVo from recording “accidentally” crippled Fox shows, etc), that had the great good fortune to get its technology mandated under the DMCA. That meant that it could charge anything it wanted to the entertainment industry for its nonfunctional anti-video-user technology, and it proceeded to hose the living hell out of Hollywood

And then quotes from Amorosos’s nonsense:

DRM increases not decreases consumer value –
I believe that most piracy occurs because the technology available today has not yet been widely deployed to make DRM-protected legitimate content as easily accessible and convenient as unprotected illegitimate content is to consumers. The solution is to accelerate the deployment of convenient DRM-protected distribution channels—not to abandon them. Without a reasonable, consistent and transparent DRM we will only delay consumers in receiving premium content in the home, in the way they want it. For example, DRM is uniquely suitable for metering usage rights, so that consumers who don’t want to own content, such as a movie, can “rent” it. Similarly, consumers who want to consume content on only a single device can pay less than those who want to use it across all of their entertainment areas – vacation homes, cars, different devices and remotely. Abandoning DRM now will unnecessarily doom all consumers to a “one size fits all” situation that will increase costs for many of them.

As Cory says, this is utter nonsense. I don’t think even Amoroso actually believes this; the idea that protected media will be cheaper has never been true, and there’s no reason to think it will be true in the future.

What he’s saying, simply, is this freedom stuff threatens my wallet.

Go check out Cory’s post. As usual, he gives brilliant rant.

One thought on “Rock ’em sock ’em ceos – why my boss can beat up their boss”

  1. the system that stops you from hooking up your VCR and your DVD player in series

    AHA! So those are the stupid fuckers who made my life doubly miserable after my house was robbed. My television set is so old that DVD players simply will not plug into it. My first DVD player, though, would play on my television if plugged into my VCR which COULD plug into the TV. Imagine my surprise when I got a DVD player for Christmas replacing the one that was stolen, only to find that I could not start my Firefly/Serenity marathon as planned. GRRRRRRR!!!!!!!!!

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